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NRA Appeals Seventh Circuit Ruling to the U.S. Supreme Court

June 3, 2009

NRA Appeals Seventh Circuit Ruling to the U.S. Supreme Court

Fairfax, Va. – Today, the National Rifle Association filed a petition for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of NRA v. Chicago. The NRA strongly disagrees with yesterday’s decision issued by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, holding that the Second Amendment does not apply to state and local governments.

“The Seventh Circuit got it wrong. As the Supreme Court said in last year’s landmark Heller decision, the Second Amendment is an individual right that ‘belongs to all Americans’. Therefore, we are taking our case to the highest court in the land,” said Chris W. Cox, NRA chief lobbyist. “The Seventh Circuit claimed it was bound by precedent from previous decisions. However, it should have followed the lead of the recent Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision in Nordyke v. Alameda County, which found that those cases don’t prevent the Second Amendment from applying to the states through the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.”

This Seventh Circuit opinion upholds current bans on the possession of handguns in Chicago and Oak Park, Illinois.

“It is wrong that the residents of Chicago and Oak Park continue to have their Second Amendment rights denied,” Cox concluded. “It’s time for the fundamental right of self-defense to be respected by every jurisdiction throughout our country.”

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Established in 1871, the National Rifle Association is America’s oldest civil rights and sportsmen’s group. Four million members strong, NRA continues its mission to uphold Second Amendment rights and to advocate enforcement of existing laws against violent offenders to reduce crime. The Association remains the nation’s leader in firearm education and training for law-abiding gun owners, law enforcement and the military.

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One Comment leave one →
  1. StevenDDeacon permalink
    June 4, 2009 3:59 pm

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit just didn’t get it right they didn’t even come close. The history of militias has always been a State and personal right until the Militia Act of 1903 when Congress began Federalizing the State Militias into the National Guard. By 1917 the National Guard was all but Federalized. By 1987 the Federalization of the National Guard was complete. However Congressional Acts to federalize the National Guard left a loop hole in the Militia Act of 1903 which provided for “unorganized militias” which allowed the States to conscript men and women of the the age of seventeen to fory-four to be called to service in an “unorganized” State militia. The National Guard was never suppose to be deployed to foreign soil. Thus I believe it is time for the States to begin organizing their “unorganized” militias.

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